Hill mountain – Har Tzion http://har-tzion.com/ Mon, 09 May 2022 06:00:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://har-tzion.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/favicon-4-150x150.png Hill mountain – Har Tzion http://har-tzion.com/ 32 32 The most important things to wear while mountain biking https://har-tzion.com/the-most-important-things-to-wear-while-mountain-biking/ Mon, 09 May 2022 06:00:34 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/the-most-important-things-to-wear-while-mountain-biking/ In mountain biking, comfort and safety are paramount. Of course, you can wear anything. Some pro athletes wear denim on gnarly trails. But when you want maximum comfort and protection, you need to know the most important things to wear when mountain biking. We have organized our guide which incorporates different MTB clothing and equipment. […]]]>

In mountain biking, comfort and safety are paramount. Of course, you can wear anything. Some pro athletes wear denim on gnarly trails. But when you want maximum comfort and protection, you need to know the most important things to wear when mountain biking. We have organized our guide which incorporates different MTB clothing and equipment. Here’s everything you need to stick to your style on the mountain trails.

Equipment to wear

The main merit of mountain biking is that you are not limited to lycra and wetsuits, like in cyclo-cross and short-track cross-country racing. If you’re new to mountain biking, you’ll want to buy clothing made from synthetic fibers such as spandex, nylon, and wool. The materials draw moisture to the surface, preventing you from having a soggy ride in the summer, which is very irritating. Try to avoid cotton wool as it absorbs moisture and could be the cause of cycling-induced hypothermia.

Helmet

Investing in a good helmet could save your life. Helmets have evolved from one-size-fits-all helmets to helmets for enduro racing, downhill racing, and single-track trail riding. Full face helmets are ideal for downhill racing and offer unparalleled protection. If you ride single trials or enduro, a helmet with a removable mouth guard is ideal. Removable mouth guards allow you to drink and spit water and provide additional ventilation. The helmets have a visor that protects you from rock chips and low branches. You should not skimp on the quality of the helmet. The best helmets sit low in the back of the head and incorporate MIPS technology which reduces rotational effects on the brain in the event of a crash. The Giro MIPS and Troy Lee Designs A3 MIPS fixtures are some of the best.

Eye protection clothing

Goggles protect your eyes from glare and flying debris from your front wheel. Opt for glasses with interchangeable polarized lenses. Tinted lenses reduce glare and increase contrast in brightly lit areas, while clear lenses make cycling in the dark easier. Most cyclists wear goggles for downhill races. However, it is advisable to always wear mountain bike goggles. Most goggles are compatible with helmets in “full enduro” equipment.

Shoes

A good base is imperative when mountain biking. Cycling shoes are either compatible with platform pedals or clipless. When people talk about shoes without a clip, they are referring to shoes with a clip that attaches to the pedal. Some pedals offer a double-sided entry allowing for faster clipping when you’re in a hurry. Clipless pedals and shoes can be difficult to master at first, but they become second nature in no time. Your other option is platform shoes compatible with platform pedals. Platform pedals are the flat pedals you had on your first bike. Flat shoes go well with platform pedals. Socks also play a crucial role in the comfort of the shoe – more on that later. Whether you like clipless or platform, you need to consider waterproof capabilities. A Velcro cover prevents your shoes from getting soggy when it starts to rain in the mountains.

Armor and padding

We’ve never seen any mountain bikers, even pro athletes, run without armor and without padding on their hands, knees and elbows. There are lightweight and slim options for the safety conscious rider. Thick padding and armor are the reserves of riders who want to get to the bottom of the hill as quickly as possible and are prone to breaking down. Sometimes the knee pads slip. Especially if you don’t get the right size, make sure the pads fit snugly but don’t restrict knee rotation. Scratching your knees or bumping your elbows could end your cycling career. The faster you run, the more cover you will need. It doesn’t hurt to have a layer or two of padding to protect your hands, knees and elbows.

Gloves

You will notice that there are two types of gloves depending on the length of the fingers. For extreme mountain biking you will need full gloves. The gloves have padding on the palm for extra protection in case of slips and cuts. Breathability is essential as long hours of cycling can make your hands sweaty. You need gloves that absorb moisture from your hands to the surface.

Shorts

Having a good base is the key factor that determines your comfort. Spandex and padded shorts are disappearing from the market, replaced by moisture-wicking fabrics. You still have spandex shorts with removable liners that allow you to customize your comfort. Chamois, padded liners or chamois keep your butt comfortable sitting in the saddle for long hours. Also consider the pockets and stretchiness of the shorts before buying one. Avoid cotton shorts.

Swimwear, tops and jackets

Jerseys do not strictly protect you or add comfort. But they determine whether you will feel good and look good. Short-sleeved jerseys are generally lightweight and feature mesh inserts to increase breathability. Riding on a trail with trees and thorns naturally steers you towards long-sleeved jerseys. There are different styles and colors to suit your aesthetic needs. Like shorts, choose jerseys that wick away moisture. Plus, a pocket to store your phone or race badge comes in handy.

Socks

You can wear almost any type of mountain bike sock. The recommended sock is thick and waterproof to prevent water from seeping into your shoes and getting cold feet (literally). Linen socks are ideal for summer conditions, while you can add an extra layer of thickness with wool socks.

Cold weather clothing

It may not always be a beautiful sunny day for mountain biking. But should the cold keep you from having fun? The right cold weather gear allows you to enjoy mountain biking despite the cool conditions. A thick waterproof jacket acts as a shield against the cold and wind. If you plan on making mountain biking a year-round activity, we recommend investing in hybrid jackets.

Conclusion

Your head is the most important part of mountain bike racing. You should invest in the best helmets and goggles to protect yourself. Step up your protection game with padding and armor. Remember that protection doesn’t mean you have to compromise on quality. A diverse range of colors and styles of garments meet your aesthetic and protection needs.

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A “potentially historic” forest fire episode threatens the southwest https://har-tzion.com/a-potentially-historic-forest-fire-episode-threatens-the-southwest/ Sat, 07 May 2022 17:24:44 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/a-potentially-historic-forest-fire-episode-threatens-the-southwest/ Placeholder while loading article actions Critical to extreme wildfire conditions are poised to grip the Southwestern United States and parts of Colorado, sparking what could be a long, days-long and memorable outbreak of wildfires. of forest and/or forest fire conditions. Hot to locally scorching temperatures, very dry air and strong mountain gusts are expected to […]]]>
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Critical to extreme wildfire conditions are poised to grip the Southwestern United States and parts of Colorado, sparking what could be a long, days-long and memorable outbreak of wildfires. of forest and/or forest fire conditions. Hot to locally scorching temperatures, very dry air and strong mountain gusts are expected to overlap for several days, as part of a summer climate with no risk of significant precipitation.

The Albuquerque National Weather Service calls it a “dangerous, long-lasting, and potentially historic fire weather event.” Powder keg conditions conducive to rapidly spreading fires are expected to persist into next week. Sunday can feature the most extreme combination of high winds and hot, dry air.

On May 4, President Biden declared the Calf Canyon Fire, now the second largest fire on record in the state, a major disaster. (Video: John Farrell/The Washington Post)

“New Mexico faces 100 straight hours of the worst possible fire conditions, with high temperatures and extreme winds,” Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham (D) tweeted on Friday. “It is extremely important to respect the evacuation orders. Your life and safety are the top priority.

She added“I ask every New Mexican to do everything they can to avoid any further fires, anything that could cause a spark. No open flames, no campfires, no open grills, no welding, no cigarette butts – please work with us to prevent fires and conserve resources.

As it stands, a number of ongoing fires will continue to burn and will be made worse by the weather this weekend. New ignitions are also expected, which could quickly spiral out of control.

Earlier this week, the Calf Canyon fire became the second largest on record in New Mexico. In late April, it merged with the Hermit’s Peak Fire just to the east, a prescribed burn whose crews lost control amid high winds. The cause of the Calf Canyon fire is under investigation.

Located on high ground east of Santa Fe in Mora and San Miguel counties, the Calf Canyon fire has already burned 170,665 acres and is contained at 21%. More than 1,400 personnel from three states are actively involved in the fight against the fire, which has destroyed at least 276 structures and forced more than 4,000 evacuations.

Andy Lyon, public information manager with the Southwest Incident Management Team, told the Washington Post that 15,000 residences could be at risk over the weekend all around the perimeter of the fire. .

Large fires are raging in New Mexico and the worst may be yet to come

The Calf Canyon fire is among six large fires burning in New Mexico. The fires prompted President Biden to declare a major disaster for parts of the state on Wednesday so that federal assistance can reach affected residents.

Red flag warnings, for dangerous fire weather conditions, cover all of New Mexico, as well as western Texas, eastern and northern Arizona, southern Nevada, the Inland Empire and the deserts of California and much of southern and eastern Colorado.

The Albuquerque Weather Service is urging residents to be prepared to evacuate, telling them to “remember [their] ps” — people, pets, prescriptions, photos, papers, personal computer and phone.

“But if there’s not enough time, just take your family and go,” he wrote.

As well as fanning the flames, high winds are also expected to kick up areas of blowing dust, limiting visibility. And dust and smoke will degrade the air quality.

The turbulent weather pattern is the result of a sharp drop in the jet stream – the river of high altitude winds – in the western United States. This decline will remain entrenched until at least the middle of next week, directing a torrent of westerly and southwesterly winds over the southwest and south of the Rocky Mountains.

The weekend’s strongest winds will rush over the Colorado Highlands, where gusts exceeding 70 mph are possible. Elsewhere, widespread winds of 40 to 55 mph are likely in the mountains through Monday, slackening a little each night but coming back strong during the day.

Meanwhile, low pressure will eject from the Colorado Front Range on Sunday, pulling a dry blow to the east. This will reinforce a “dry line” in West Texas and Oklahoma. In the east, tropical humidity will prevail, but desert air will invade areas to the west.

The combination of abnormally high temperatures, reaching 95 to 100 degrees in western Texas and eastern New Mexico, and “downsloping” air rolling down the Rocky Mountains will contribute to relative humidity percentages at a figure. Computer models suggest humidity could drop to just 4% in the Texas Permian Basin.

This is on top of an “exceptional” Level 4 of 4 drought already in place, with its center of gravity centered in eastern New Mexico and parts of the Texas Panhandle and Hill Country.

Conditions may improve over the coming week, but a look at the extended pattern shows little influx of moisture into the water-hungry region. “More critical fire weather is expected Tuesday through the remainder of the week, although coverage is likely to be less overall,” the Albuquerque Weather Department wrote.

New Mexico fires have been burning 270,000 acres so far this year, the second highest in the past decade, and the fire season is now entering its peak. The exceptionally active season is linked to the persistence of strong winds, drought and above-normal temperatures. Several of the fires are burning in areas where winter snowfall was well below normal.

Authorities have urged residents of northern New Mexico to prepare for evacuation on May 1 as the Hermits Peak and Calf Canyon wildfires continue to spread. (Video: Reuters)

In the United States, wildfire activity is 78% above the 10-year average so far this year, according to a fact sheet released by the White House.

Research links rising temperatures to intensified droughts caused by human-induced climate change and longer and more severe fire seasons. Hot, arid conditions quickly dry out vegetation, making the land surface more combustible. Conditions this year may portend a fiery future not only for New Mexico, but for much of the Southwest as well.

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The Royal Court of MSFF Miners has been announced | News, Sports, Jobs https://har-tzion.com/the-royal-court-of-msff-miners-has-been-announced-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 07 May 2022 07:29:45 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/the-royal-court-of-msff-miners-has-been-announced-news-sports-jobs/ ELKINS — The Minor Royal Court of Maid Silvia LXXXIV was selected and announced by Mountain State Forest Festival General Manager Robbie Morris and Queen’s Department Manager Tracy Gooden. The 84th Royal Court will be represented by Crown Bearer Max Ryan Jones, Scepter Bearer Eleanor Faye Davis, Flower Girls Avery Grace Fox, Baelynn Lee Irons, […]]]>

ELKINS — The Minor Royal Court of Maid Silvia LXXXIV was selected and announced by Mountain State Forest Festival General Manager Robbie Morris and Queen’s Department Manager Tracy Gooden.

The 84th Royal Court will be represented by Crown Bearer Max Ryan Jones, Scepter Bearer Eleanor Faye Davis, Flower Girls Avery Grace Fox, Baelynn Lee Irons, Addison Grace Smyton, Kendall Brooke Ward and Train Porters Nicholas Joseph. “NEW JERSEY” Patella and Cooper Preston Warner.

Max Ryan Jones is the son of Grant and Lydia Jones of Elkins. He is the grandson of Norman and Linda Wagner of Elkins and Neil and Linda Jones of Morgantown.

Max will be a first grader at Midland Elementary this fall. He likes camping, going to the beach and playing with his trains and legos.

Eleanor Faye Davis is the daughter of Chris and Samantha Davis of Elkins. She is the granddaughter of John and Karen Tallman and Jim and Terri Davis, all of Elkins. Eleanor has a sister, Evalynn.

Irons

In the fall, she will be a kindergarten student at Jennings Randolph Elementary School. She dances with West Virginia Highland Dance and studies ballet and gymnastics at Dance by Farrah. Her hobbies include painting, driving her 4-wheeler, and spending time swimming and playing outside with her sister, Evalynn.

Avery Grace Fox is the daughter of Doug and Calli Fox of Beverly. She is the granddaughter of Stephen and Vickie Posey of Buckhannon and Steve and Debbie Fox of Mill Creek. She has a brother, Jackson.

In the fall, she will be a third-grade student at Beverly Elementary. She is a PAX leader and a member of her school’s running club. She is part of the competitive teams of Center Stage and Tumble Time Gymnastics. She enjoys math and science as well as playing soccer, running 5k races, singing and playing with her little brother in her spare time.

Baelynn Irons is the daughter of Justin and Lori Irons of Elkins. She is the granddaughter of Rick and Linda Irons of Elkins and Grant and Joellen Trent of West Union. She has two sisters, Lilly and Aleah.

Baelynn is a homeschooler and will enter third grade this fall. She is a member of Cornerstone Church, swims for the Elkins Otters, and is a member of the YMCA Rays swim team. She takes piano lessons and enjoys playing music in her church. In her spare time, she enjoys playing outdoors, kayaking and camping with her family.

Smyton

Addison Grace Smyton is the daughter of Roger and Wendy Smyton of Elkins. She is the granddaughter of AnnaRuth Wetzel and Robert Cottrell and Forest G. “Junior” and Alicia Wetzel, all of Elkins, and the late John and Melba Smyton of Dryfork. She has a brother, Garrett.

This fall, Addison will be entering third grade at North Elementary. She attends Dance by Farrah where she is on the competitive dance team and she attends Mountain Gymnastics Academy where she is on the competitive gymnastics team. She is a cheerleader for Bengals Youth Football as well as North Elementary and plays softball for the Randolph County Youth Softball League Hericanes. She is a member of the Meadow Grove Green Growers 4-H Club. In her spare time, she enjoys coloring, painting, drawing and spending time with her family. She attends the First Baptist Church.

Kendall Brooke Ward is the daughter of Krista Ward of Elkins and Richard Ward of Buckhannon. She is the granddaughter of Ronald and Brenda Cunningham of Elkins and Alma and the late Ronald Whitehair, father of Davis and great-granddaughter of John and Carolyn Cunningham of Whitmer. She has a brother, Kolton.

Kendall will be entering fourth grade this fall at Midland Elementary. She is on the honor roll and has perfect attendance. She attends Dance by Farrah where she competes with the Mini Hip Hop team. She is a member of the Elkins Otters swim team, played basketball for the YMCA Might Mites league, plays soccer with Seneca Soccer, and is a cheerleader for Midland Elementary. She is a Brownie with Pathfinder Troop 51432, attends First United Methodist Church, and is a member of the Pioneer Club. In her spare time, she enjoys horseback riding at Saddles and Smiles, reading, drawing, writing, and spending time with family and friends.

Nicholas Joseph “NEW JERSEY” Patella is the son of Nick and Ann Marie Patella de Kerens. He is the grandson of Chris and Diana Patella of Elkins and Larry and Linda Lamb of Fairmont, North Carolina. He has a brother, Noah, and a sister, Neva.

Room

NJ will be in third grade this fall at North Elementary. He plays Elkins Little League baseball and attends First United Methodist Church. He likes to practice all sports and particularly enjoys recess at school. In his spare time he enjoys gardening and doing projects with his dad, and he enjoys reading and loves history. He is a great big brother to his siblings and loves animals.

Cooper Preston Warner is the son of William and Moriah Cooper of Elkins. He is the grandson of Terry and Roxanna Cooper of Elkins, Dana “Ray” White of Beverly and Henry and Shirley Williams of Buckhannon.

This fall, Cooper will be a fifth grader at Midland Elementary where he is a “A” honor roll student. He plays Elkins Little League baseball and is a member of the Ski Hi 4-H club. In his spare time, he enjoys 4-wheeling, fishing, hunting, watching sports, listening to music, reading, playing video games and spending time with his family and friends. Cooper attends the Elkins Family Worship Center.

Please join the Royal Court of Maid Silvia LXXXIV as they descend Coronation Hill on the campus of Davis and Elkins College on Friday October 7th. For more information on the 84th Mountain State Forest Festival, please visit the website, www.forestfestival.com.

Davis

Jones

Warner

ball joint


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Music of the Mountains: Ghost Town Drifters https://har-tzion.com/music-of-the-mountains-ghost-town-drifters/ Thu, 05 May 2022 16:18:54 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/music-of-the-mountains-ghost-town-drifters/ The members of Colorado band Ghost Town Drifters are no strangers to bluegrass. After mandolin player Oren Paisner and his childhood friend Alex Tocco first discovered a mandolin as teenagers, they decided to play with another friend at a local bluegrass jam, featuring mandolin, guitar and banjo in hand. While they had no idea what […]]]>

The members of Colorado band Ghost Town Drifters are no strangers to bluegrass. After mandolin player Oren Paisner and his childhood friend Alex Tocco first discovered a mandolin as teenagers, they decided to play with another friend at a local bluegrass jam, featuring mandolin, guitar and banjo in hand. While they had no idea what they were doing, the other artists that night supported them and offered various bluegrass artists to check out.

Initially, Paisner was a guitarist, but he decided to change things when he realized that other musicians around him mainly played guitar.

Paisner had teamed up with guitarist Andrew DeCarlo to create the band Cosmic Mesa, eventually adding bassist Scott Vincent, banjo player Joey Purmort, and violinist Nancy Steinberger to the band. In 2018, Paisner, Vincent and Purmort played in a new band, adding guitarist Tom Mueller to the mix and calling themselves Ghost Town Drifters.

The new band’s first gig was at the Golden Community Garden, and since then they have opened bands such as Bill Nershi of String Cheese Incident, Jeremy Garett of Infamous Springdusters, Kitchen Dwellers, Rumpke Mountain Boys and Jeff Austin of Yonder. . Group of mountain ropes. They also had a significant lineup change, with Mueller leaving the band to focus on his career and marriage and Tocco, Miles Ridnell and Branon Barrett joining.

Paisner cites artists such as Bill Monroe, The Kentucky Colonels and Brothers Osborne as major influences on their current sound. He says that all of the band members are incredibly enthusiastic about playing, writing, training and taking the band to the next level, and hopes that each of their concerts will put a smile on the faces of the public and will make them forget the stress of life.

If you want to see Ghost Town Drifters perform live, you can catch them at Howlin Wind Brewing,

At Main Street in Rollinsville, Saturday, May 21, 2022, at 4 p.m. For more information on the group, visit their website at www.ghosttowndrifters.com.

Right here are the Advertisement of inhabit music this the week! To verify this outside and Support your local the musicians.

Busey Brasse

Sunday, May 8 at 2 p.m. – Kylie Brock

Sunday, May 15 at 2 p.m. – Taylor Anastasio

Sunday, May 22 at 2 p.m. – Grant Livingston

Sunday May 29 at 2 p.m. – Zea Stallings

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ Busey Brews/

Website: buseybrews.com/

Location: 70 E. 1st Street, Nederland

Phone: 1-855-633-2739

Caribou Room

Friday, May 20 at 8 p.m. – Twang is Dead with Dave Watts

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ lecaribouroom/

Website: www.thecaribouroom.com/

Location: 55 Indian Peaks Drive, The Netherlands

Phone: 303-258-3637

Covered wagon

Every Thursday at 7 p.m. – Karaoke

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ covered wagonrestaurants/

Website: www.couvertwagonrestaurant.com/

Location: 15 East 1st Street, The Netherlands

Phone: 303-258-7578

Golden Hill Inn

Friday, May 6 at 8:30 p.m. – Scott Slay and the Rail

Saturday, May 7 at 7 p.m. – Martin Gilmore

Friday, May 13 at 8:30 p.m. – Foxfeather

Saturday May 14 at 7 p.m. – BillEby Brothers (Billy Shaddox and Eben Grace)

Sunday, May 15 at 5 p.m. – Chris Koza

Friday, May 20 at 8:30 p.m. – High Lonesome

Saturday May 21 at 7 p.m. – Zickefoose Duo

Sunday May 22 at 6 p.m. – Kara Elizabeth Trio

Friday, May 27 at 8:30 p.m. – River Arkansas

Saturday, May 28 at 5 p.m. – Daniel Wander with Copper Tale

Sunday May 29 at 5 p.m. – Strangebyrds

Monday May 30 at 12:30 p.m. – Mountain Music Festival

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ Gold Hill Inn/

Website: goldhillinn.com

Location: 401 Main Street, Gold Hill.

Phone: 303-443-6461

Howlin Wind Brewing

Saturday, May 21 at 4 p.m. – Ghost Town Drifters

Website: www.howlinwindbrewing.com/

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ howlinwindbrewing

Location: 51 A Main Street, Rollinsville.

Phone: 309-825-5245

Jamestown Trade

Thursday, May 5 at 7 p.m. – Matty G Band

Friday, May 6 at 7 p.m. – Abstract Drag Show

Thursday, May 12 at 7 p.m. – Lost Penny

Friday May 13 at 7 p.m. – Jasmin Kingdom

Thursday, May 19 at 7 p.m. – DJ ¿Whocares?

Thursday May 26 at 7 p.m. – Covenhoven

Friday, May 27 at 7 p.m. – Colorado Midnight Train

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ jamestown.mercantile/

Website: www.jamestownmercantile.com/

Location: 108 Main Street, Jamestown.

Phone: 303-442-5847

Knotted root brewing

Every Sunday at 4 p.m. – Jazz Sundays with Black Dog

Friday, May 6 at 5 p.m. – Good for Nothin’ Thunder Mountain Boys

Friday, May 13 at 5 p.m. – Andrew Cooney of Flash Mountain Flood

Friday, May 20 at 5 p.m. – Matt Flaherty

Website: www.knottedrootbrewing.com/home

Location: 250 N. Caribou Street, The Netherlands.

Phone: 720-248-7129

Last Stand Tavern

Friday May 6 at 7 p.m. – Karaoke with PJ the DJ

Saturday, May 7 at 5 p.m. – JJ Fraser

Friday May 13 at 7:30 p.m. – Karaoke with Phil the Jukebox

Saturday, May 14 at 5 p.m. – Rick Lobato and Chuck Lettes

Friday May 20 at 7 p.m. – Karaoke with PJ the DJ

Saturday, May 21 at 5 p.m. – 9’s a Pair The Fireman Band

Friday May 27 at 7:30 p.m. – Karaoke with Phil the Jukebox

Saturday, May 28 at 5 p.m. – Chris Koltak

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ last tavern /

Website: laststandtavern.com/

Location: 32138 Highway 72, Coal Creek Canyon.

Phone: 303-642-3180

Ned’s Coffee

Dam Jam Thursdays at 10 p.m. Karaoke on Sundays at 7 p.m.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ eat/

Website: www.eatneds.com/

Location: 121 N. Jefferson Street, The Netherlands.

Phone: 303-258-0614

Netherlands Farmer’s Market

Sunday, May 8 at 10:30 a.m. – Darcy Nelson

Sunday May 22 at 10:30 a.m. – Eric Richard Stone

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ NederlandFarmersMarket/

Website: www.nederlandfarmersmarket.org/

Location: 85 E. 1st Street, Nederland.

united center

Saturday, May 21 at 7 p.m. – The Bonnie and Taylor Simms Band

Website: www.unitedcenterinc.com/

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ UnitedCenterInc/

Email: unitedcenterinc@gmail.com

Location: 1440 Colorado Boulevard Idaho Springs

Phone: 303-900-8689 Very nice brewery

Friday, May 6 at 6 p.m. – Tim Mooney

Thursday, May 12 at 6 p.m. – Ryan Farris

Friday, May 13 at 6 p.m. – Eric Stone and his friends

Saturday, May 14 at 5 p.m. – Riley Martin

Friday, May 20 at 6 p.m. – Marc Townes and Friends

Saturday, May 21 at 5 p.m. – Grant Livingston

Friday, May 27 at 6 p.m. – Dan Williams

Sunday, May 29 at 4 p.m. – Chad Carrier

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ very good beer

Website: www.verynicebrewing.com/

Location: 20 E. Lakeview Drive, #112, The Netherlands.

Phone: 303-258-3770

We missed you ?

Did we miss your music list in the Peak to Peak area? Do you have any updates regarding your business? Please call 303-810-5409 or email publisher1977@gmail.com to be included in the next edition.

]]> SADAH alum transforms a pop-up art space into a permanent gallery https://har-tzion.com/sadah-alum-transforms-a-pop-up-art-space-into-a-permanent-gallery/ Wed, 04 May 2022 04:05:11 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/sadah-alum-transforms-a-pop-up-art-space-into-a-permanent-gallery/ SADAH alum Lacey Vilandry (BFA ’17) recently opened her gallery, The Pigment Sanctuary, in Princeton, W.Va. It’s a brick-and-mortar version of a tented gallery and studio that she and her friends created eight years ago at the Fête de la Musique mountain, which continues in June with 31 participating artists. Here, she talks about the […]]]>

SADAH alum Lacey Vilandry (BFA ’17) recently opened her gallery, The Pigment Sanctuary, in Princeton, W.Va. It’s a brick-and-mortar version of a tented gallery and studio that she and her friends created eight years ago at the Fête de la Musique mountain, which continues in June with 31 participating artists. Here, she talks about the gallery’s arts education mission and several projects with a local non-profit group.

“The Pigment Sanctuary just needed a little push from me. We got together eight years ago when a group of artists who wanted to go to concerts paint all the time. There is a special camaraderie that comes from spending weekend after weekend, festival after festival, painting after painting. We soon realized that what we could create together was better than competing with each other. We set up galleries under the same tents, sometimes as small as a 10×10 awning, sometimes a circus tent that required the construction of two medium-sized elephants. We had as many triumphs as tragedies, and those who remained in adverse conditions – even a tornado once – are what make up The Pigment Sanctuary.

My business partner, Ashton Hill, was the first to launch live paint galleries for our team, and Mountain Music Festival has been The Pigment Sanctuary’s family reunion from the start. It was in the summer of 2018 that Ashton and I began discussing formalizing The Pigment Sanctuary as a collective, but it wasn’t until I moved to Princeton, WV in December 2019 that I started pushing for a permanent seat. Because of this city’s immense support for the arts and the low cost of living in the area, I knew it was the perfect place to put down our roots. After looking at a few locations, we settled on a 1200 square foot space that at the time was a cafe overflow and storage. Ashton and two other Pigment Sanctuary members moved to town shortly after we started renting the space, and the gallery took just over six months to build. We wanted our gallery to be as unique as our artists’ journey. We designed it to be a whimsical deep forest scene, but also a cozy space to relax, drink coffee and take workshops.

Arts education has become an integral part of what we do. We have taught workshops at festivals and separately, so it was important to incorporate them into what we do here at Princeton. Over the years we have learned so much from each other that we want to be able to share it. There is a real need for workshops and art classes in this area, to try to capture what public schools cannot reach. Between multi-day intensives, introductory courses to master’s level courses, professional development and artistic evenings, we hope to reach everyone, regardless of their background, age, financial situation or ability. artistic.

Ashton led our first seminar in Virginia with Master Mischtechnik Phil Rubinov Jacobson. It was three weeks at the White Lotus Resort outside of Charlottesville, and we are looking to continue to grow with more teachers coming from all over the country.

Beyond what The Pigment Sanctuary does directly with mainstream art, several PS members and I also work closely with the RiffRaff Arts Collective. This is a 501c3 organization led by Lori McKinney (another JMU graduate), focused on revitalizing struggling downtown areas in southern Appalachia through the arts. With them, I started a monthly fine and folk art market called the heART market, which is free for sellers and helps budding entrepreneurs at the start of their artistic journey.

Another project with the RRAC is a food forest initiative. When I first moved to town, I started pushing the idea that grasslands should grow food instead. After almost two years, it is happening. The city gives us property to cleverly run a food forest, and if all goes well, they’re going to give us properties in every neighborhood of the city. The primary effort is to end hunger in the city, and the secondary is to commission as many local installation artists as possible. Each garden will have a theme that will dictate the composition of the garden and the art. We want to incorporate as many native plants as possible as we go, which will help create a stable ecosystem that will restore the soil and continue to grow if there is a time when it does not receive regular maintenance.

Last year I led a community mural through RiffRaff called Memories on Mercer Street. It was designed by Ellen Elmes, who specializes in depicting peoples’ stories through murals. It was printed on fabric in grayscale on 18 5’x3′ panels. I ran community paints, where I mixed paint and guided people through the process like a paint-by-number. The inspiration for the design was the stories of people who grew up here and saw the neighborhood’s golden age. We had a storytelling night on Zoom where people told us what it was like growing up here.

I recently received a grant from the West Virginia Commission of the Arts, funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, to paint educational wildflowers around downtown Princeton. Each mural will feature depictions of the plant’s uses and scannable QR codes linked to additional information. I choose the location of each mural based on how “forgotten” a location looks. I’ve found that people will care more about a place if they can see its beauty, which starts with someone’s ability and willingness to bring out that beauty.

Information about Pigment Sactuary workshops is available on their website.

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Pennsylvania wildland firefighters had a busy weekend as large fires erupted across the region, including one on Blue Mountain – The Morning Call https://har-tzion.com/pennsylvania-wildland-firefighters-had-a-busy-weekend-as-large-fires-erupted-across-the-region-including-one-on-blue-mountain-the-morning-call/ Mon, 02 May 2022 10:15:31 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/pennsylvania-wildland-firefighters-had-a-busy-weekend-as-large-fires-erupted-across-the-region-including-one-on-blue-mountain-the-morning-call/ Pennsylvania wildland firefighters are frequently called upon to help other states and federal agencies fight wildfires, but over the weekend they were busy at home. Much of the state was expected to be at high wildfire risk, with weather showing dry and windy conditions throughout the weekend. On Friday evening, flames broke out just after […]]]>

Pennsylvania wildland firefighters are frequently called upon to help other states and federal agencies fight wildfires, but over the weekend they were busy at home.

Much of the state was expected to be at high wildfire risk, with weather showing dry and windy conditions throughout the weekend.

On Friday evening, flames broke out just after 7 p.m. in the Glen Summit development of Fairview Township, Luzerne County, according to WNEP.

The wind carried the fire away from any house or business, Fox56 reportedbut videos and photos shared on social media showed flames spreading across the region.

On Saturday, a fire broke out on Rich Hill Road in West Rockhill Township, Bucks County, and appeared to involve a large area near Quakertown.

On Sunday, firefighters battled a large brush fire on Blue Mountain in Lehigh Township.

Crews worked for hours to extinguish the blaze near Lehigh Drive and Mountain Road. At one point, a helicopter dropped water on the fire.

Multiple departments in at least two counties, Lehigh and Carbon, responded.

“PMFD is currently assisting several agencies on Blue Mountain with our ATV unit,” a message from the Palmer Municipal Fire Department said on Facebook.

“A reminder to our residents, our county is in a high risk RED zone for bushfires. Please avoid fire pits, keep your mulch beds saturated, and always remember that open burning is PROHIBITED in the township.

The response from other local fire departments, as well as the DCNR Forestry Bureau, was ultimately aided by Mother Nature as rain rolled into the area on Sunday evening.

The fires broke out days before Community Wildfire Preparedness Day, a national campaign that encourages people and organizations meet on the first Saturday in May take steps to raise awareness and reduce the risk of forest fires.

Scenes of scorching brush and mountains consumed by wildfires are becoming more common throughout Pennsylvania. As a result, firefighters have “a more nuanced understanding of wildfires,” Michael D. Kern, state wildland fire chief, written in a spring newsletter of the DCNR.

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In 2021, there were 1,371 wildfires in Pennsylvania that consumed 2,981 acres. Of these events, 746 were caused by burning debris, which may include someone burning rubbish or yard waste. These fires frequently start in someone’s garden and spread through grass and leaf litter to nearby forests.

When a fire breaks out anywhere in the state, first responders are made up of local fire departments, including volunteers in rural areas working in conjunction with wildland fire rangers. As these groups lead the fight against wildfires, they point to census figures that show more people moving from suburban to rural areas to settle near or in the forest.

Firefighters call the area where homes and development meet or mingle with undeveloped forests the “wilderness-urban interface” and say more than half of all wildfires in the state occur in these areas. areas.

Later this month, the Pennsylvania Wildland Fire Academy will return after a two-year hiatus, the 2022 academy focusing on wild engine operations. It will consist of fifteen courses, ranging from basic to advanced level, and will include both classroom and on-the-job training.

The academy will take place at Shippensburg University from May 31 to June 5. All classes are designed to meet national standards and there are no tuition fees. All meals and accommodation are provided on site through the Forestry Bureau.

According to the DCNR, basic wildland firefighters must take four courses totaling 46 hours, as well as an eight-hour refresher course each year.

Morning Call editor Stephanie Sigafoos can be reached at 610-820-6612 or ssigafoos@mcall.com.

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Expected critical fire conditions; 19,000 acres burned https://har-tzion.com/expected-critical-fire-conditions-19000-acres-burned/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 18:10:26 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/expected-critical-fire-conditions-19000-acres-burned/ Firefighters continued to better control the Tunnel Fire that was burning 14 miles northeast of Flagstaff, its size remaining at 19,075 acres and 89% contained as of Saturday morning. The blaze, burning across US 89, was reported shortly before 4:30 p.m. on April 17, and its cause was under investigation, according to InciWeb, a government […]]]>

Firefighters continued to better control the Tunnel Fire that was burning 14 miles northeast of Flagstaff, its size remaining at 19,075 acres and 89% contained as of Saturday morning.

The blaze, burning across US 89, was reported shortly before 4:30 p.m. on April 17, and its cause was under investigation, according to InciWeb, a government website that tracks wildfires.

The Coconino County Sheriff’s Office reported April 21 that about 109 properties were affected by the fire, including 30 burned residences and 24 properties with destroyed outbuildings, forestry officials said.

Containment defines the amount of the perimeter of the fire surrounded by a line of control that the fire will not cross.

Critical fire weather conditions were expected for the weekend, according to the National Weather Service in Flagstaff.

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These are the 25 best places to live in CT in 2022 – NBC Connecticut https://har-tzion.com/these-are-the-25-best-places-to-live-in-ct-in-2022-nbc-connecticut/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 20:08:01 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/these-are-the-25-best-places-to-live-in-ct-in-2022-nbc-connecticut/ The website AreaVibes.com has ranked the best places to live in Connecticut, based on “livability” score. “There’s a reason 3.6 million people love to call Connecticut home. For some, it may be the allure of living close to nature or relaxing by the sea. For others, Connecticut may mean great opportunities with some of the […]]]>

The website AreaVibes.com has ranked the best places to live in Connecticut, based on “livability” score.

“There’s a reason 3.6 million people love to call Connecticut home. For some, it may be the allure of living close to nature or relaxing by the sea. For others, Connecticut may mean great opportunities with some of the state’s leading financial firms. ,” the website reads.

The list highlights Connecticut’s culture, landscape, and opportunity.

Here is an overview of the top 25 cities, towns or sections of municipalities based on this ranking.

Top 25 Places to Live in Connecticut

Here are the top 25 cities and towns on AreaVibes.com’s list of Best Places to Live in Connecticut 2022:

  • Livability score: 85
  • Crime: 67% lower than state average
  • Cost of living: 119% higher than the state average
  • Livability score: 85
  • Crime: 67% lower than state average
  • Cost of living: 74% higher than the state average
  • Livability score: 84
  • Crime: 29% lower than state average
  • Cost of living: 2% higher than state average
  • Livability score: 84
  • Crime: 34% lower than the state average
  • Cost of living: 4% higher than the state average
  • Livability score: 83
  • Crime: 21% lower than state average
  • Cost of living: 5% lower than state average
  • Livability score: 83
  • Crime: 67% above the state average
  • Cost of living: 5% lower than state average
  • Livability score: 82
  • Crime: 59% above the state average
  • Cost of living: 4% higher than the state average
  • Livability score: 82
  • Crime: 65% lower than state average
  • Cost of living: 98% higher than state average
  • Livability score: 82
  • Crime: 50% lower than state average
  • Cost of living: 71% higher than the state average
  • Livability score: 81
  • Crime: 13% lower than the state average
  • Cost of living: 3% lower than state average
  • Livability score: 81
  • Crime: 28% lower than state average
  • Cost of living: 1% higher than state average
  • Livability score: 81
  • Crime: 49% lower than state average
  • Cost of living: 82% higher than the state average
  • Livability score: 81
  • Crime: 7% above the state average
  • Cost of living: 7% lower than state average
  • Habitability score: 80
  • Crime: 56% lower than state average
  • Cost of living: 7% lower than state average
  • Habitability score: 80
  • Crime: 28% lower than state average
  • Cost of living: 8% lower than state average
  • Livability score: 79
  • Crime: 20% lower than state average
  • Cost of living: 2% higher than state average
  • Livability score: 79
  • Crime: 18% higher than the state average
  • Cost of living: 4% higher than the state average
  • Livability score: 79
  • Crime: 2% lower than state average
  • Cost of living: 7% lower than state average
  • Livability score: 78
  • Crime: 19% above the state average
  • Cost of living: 6% higher than the state average
  • Livability score: 78
  • Crime: 15% higher than the state average
  • Cost of living: 3% lower than state average
  • Livability score: 78
  • Crime: 77% lower than the state average
  • Cost of living: 41% higher than the state average
  • Livability score: 77
  • Crime: 11% lower than the state average
  • Cost of living: 9% lower than state average
  • Livability score: 77
  • Crime: 29% lower than state average
  • Cost of living: 13% lower than state average
  • Livability score: 77
  • Crime: 24% higher than the state average
  • Cost of living: 4% lower than state average
  • Livability score: 76
  • Crime: 72% higher than the state average
  • Cost of living: 15% higher than the state average
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Tunnel Fire near Flagstaff at 21,164 acres, now 15% containment https://har-tzion.com/tunnel-fire-near-flagstaff-at-21164-acres-now-15-containment/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 04:18:45 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/tunnel-fire-near-flagstaff-at-21164-acres-now-15-containment/ The Tunnel Fire burning 14 miles northeast of Flagstaff remained stable Monday night at 21,215 acres. Containment increased to 20%. The blaze, burning across US 89, was reported shortly before 4:30 p.m. on April 17, and its cause is being investigated, according to InciWeb, a government website that tracks wildfires. Many areas near the fire […]]]>

The Tunnel Fire burning 14 miles northeast of Flagstaff remained stable Monday night at 21,215 acres. Containment increased to 20%.

The blaze, burning across US 89, was reported shortly before 4:30 p.m. on April 17, and its cause is being investigated, according to InciWeb, a government website that tracks wildfires.

Many areas near the fire remain under the “fixed” status, which means residents must be prepared to evacuate

The Coconino County Sheriff’s Office reported late Thursday that about 109 properties were affected by the fire, including 30 burned residences and 24 properties with destroyed outbuildings, forestry officials said.

On Thursday, Governor Doug Ducey declared a state of emergency to help communities affected by the fire. More than 750 homes have been evacuated, according to a statement released by his office. The emergency declaration will make $200,000 from the general fund available to Arizona Emergency Management Division Director Allen Clark. The Coconino County Board of Supervisors declared a state of emergency on Tuesday, allowing them to spend emergency funds and seek support from the state of Arizona.

According to the Arizona Department of Transportation, US 89 reopened around 12:30 p.m. Sunday after being closed for about five days due to the fire.

Where is the Tunnel Fire burning?

A tunnel fire burns near Flagstaff on April 25, 2022.

The fire is burning northeast of Flagstaff across US 89, east of San Francisco Mountain, northwest of the Hundred Dollar Hill tourist attraction, west of Black Bottom Crater and south from the top of Deadman Mesa mountain.

The Tunnel Fire covered a northwest portion of Black Bill Park and is burning in Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument. The fire also reached Black Mountain.

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Celebrate National Parks Week by protecting more parks https://har-tzion.com/celebrate-national-parks-week-by-protecting-more-parks/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/celebrate-national-parks-week-by-protecting-more-parks/ Each April, the National Park Service and the National Park Foundation celebrate National Parks Week. This year, as the people of this country make a special effort to honor and visit the more than 400 national park sites from April 16 to 24, we must continue to develop our network of parks to ensure that […]]]>

Each April, the National Park Service and the National Park Foundation celebrate National Parks Week. This year, as the people of this country make a special effort to honor and visit the more than 400 national park sites from April 16 to 24, we must continue to develop our network of parks to ensure that we safeguard the diverse cultures and history of our country, preserving more public lands and waters and expanding equitable access to them. In other words, we need to protect more parks.

For more than 100 years, national parks and other public lands and waters have held an important place in the history of our country.

Many of the most iconic national parks, including the Grand Canyon in Arizona, Olympic in Washington, Joshua Tree in California, Acadia in Maine, as well as a personal favorite Zion in Utah, were first protected in as national monuments under the Antiquities Act. The Antiquities Act of 1906 gives presidents the power to protect “historic monuments, historic and prehistoric structures and other objects of historical or scientific interest”. So far, 19 presidents, Democrats and Republicans, have established or expanded 158 national monuments.

Beyond coasts, deserts, valleys and marine areas, national monuments can also allow our parks to better reflect and share the experiences of our country. Monuments like the César E. Chávez National Monument, the Birmingham National Civil Rights Monument, the Belmont-Paul National Women’s Equality Monument, as well as the Stonewall National Monument have all been designated under the law. on antiquities to help preserve history and tell the struggle for equality. and fairness.

The Biden-Harris administration launched the America the Beautiful Initiative, setting our country’s first-ever national conservation goal of protecting 30 percent of our land and waters by 2030. Known as 30×30, the initiative is a crucial part of the administration’s plan. to fight against climate change and the biodiversity crisis while making access to the outdoors more equitable. It is also an incredible opportunity to build an inclusive and resilient conservation legacy by championing local initiatives to protect places with cultural, historical and ecological resources before it is too late. And with less than eight years to 2030, we can’t waste a moment.

Fortunately, two national monument proposals are ready to be taken by the federal government.

Avi Kwa Ame in southern Nevada and Castner Range near El Paso, Texas both have significant ecological and cultural value as well as strong local support. Designating them as national monuments will protect these resources, ensuring that they are not sold to private companies.

Avi Kwa Ame has some of the Mojave Desert’s most significant biological, cultural, and recreational resources, including indigenous sacred sites and biodiversity-rich wildlife. The area is considered sacred by ten Yuman-speaking tribes as well as the Hopi and Chemehuevi Paiute as it relates to their creation, history and well-being. Local governments and chambers of commerce in neighboring communities have passed resolutions supporting the designation of the monument, which is also supported by 70% of Nevada residents.

Communities in and around El Paso have worked to conserve the Castner Range for more than half a century, which will expand access to the outdoors for the world’s largest binational community. Additionally, it is part of a distinct mountain range that is home to several important wildlife and plant species. The permanent protections of the Castner Range would also preserve important geological, paleontological and archaeological features and a cultural history that dates back 10,000 years.

As we proudly celebrate National Parks Week, we must also echo the calls of local elected officials, Indigenous leaders, conservation groups, hunters, fishers, outdoor recreation enthusiasts and other advocates who are working to protect more parks. It’s time for the Biden administration to step up the pace of conservation and make these sacred places our next national landmarks.

Gene Karpinski is president of the environmental advocacy group League of Conservation Voters.

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