Hill mountain – Har Tzion http://har-tzion.com/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 05:18:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://har-tzion.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/favicon-4-150x150.png Hill mountain – Har Tzion http://har-tzion.com/ 32 32 Bengals edge Miami 27-15 after Tagovailoa is injured | News, Sports, Jobs https://har-tzion.com/bengals-edge-miami-27-15-after-tagovailoa-is-injured-news-sports-jobs/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 05:00:12 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/bengals-edge-miami-27-15-after-tagovailoa-is-injured-news-sports-jobs/ CINCINNATI (AP) — Joe Burrow threw a late 2-yard touchdown pass to Hayden Hurst to seal a 27-15 victory for the Cincinnati Bengals over Miami on Thursday night in a game marred by the horrific sight of the quarterback of the Dolphins Tua Tagovailoa being removed on a stretcher. Tagovailoa was chased down […]]]>

CINCINNATI (AP) — Joe Burrow threw a late 2-yard touchdown pass to Hayden Hurst to seal a 27-15 victory for the Cincinnati Bengals over Miami on Thursday night in a game marred by the horrific sight of the quarterback of the Dolphins Tua Tagovailoa being removed on a stretcher.

Tagovailoa was chased down and thrown to the turf by Cincinnati’s Josh Tupou with about six minutes left in the first half. He lay in bed for more than seven minutes before being taken to hospital with head and neck injuries.

Vonn Bell’s interception of Miami backup quarterback Teddy Bridgewater – the second safety pick of the night – with three minutes left in the game set up the Bengals’ final practice.

Evan McPherson threw two field goals in the fourth quarter, including one for 57 yards.

Burrow was 20 for 31 for 287 yards and two touchdowns as the Bengals won their second game in five days after losing the first of the season. Tee Higgins caught seven passes for 124 yards and a touchdown.

Bridgewater threw an incomplete pass on Miami’s final drive to return the ball in tries with 57 seconds left.

Tagovailoa was 8 for 14 for 110 yards and an interception before his injury. Bridgewater finished 14 for 23 for 193 yards, a touchdown and an interception in relief.

Tyreek Hill paced the Dolphins with 10 catches for 160 yards.

CHEERS: At halftime, the Bengals added two players to their fledgling ring of honor at Paycor Stadium.

Isaac Curtis is considered one of the team’s greatest receivers of all time. The four-time Pro-Bowler played in Cincinnati in 1973-84 and still holds the Bengals record for average yards per reception (17.07).

Tackle Willie Anderson was considered one of the best offensive linemen of his era. Anderson played in 182 games (regular and playoffs) for Cincinnati in 1996-2007 and went to the Pro Bowl four times.

They join the inaugural class of Ring of Honor from last year: team founder/coach Paul Brown, quarterback Ken Anderson, tackle Anthony Munoz and cornerback Ken Riley.



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Local roundup: Hall-Dale field hockey rules out Boothbay https://har-tzion.com/local-roundup-hall-dale-field-hockey-rules-out-boothbay/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 23:12:30 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/local-roundup-hall-dale-field-hockey-rules-out-boothbay/ FARMINGDALE — Mira Skehan scored five goals and added an assist as the Hall-Dale field hockey team shut out Boothbay 6-0 on Wednesday. The host Bulldogs improved to 3-4-1; the Seahawks fell to 0-6. Kiley Rolfe scored Hall-Dale’s other goal, while teammates Torie Tibbetts and Faith McDougal each provided two assists. Brooke Michuad also had […]]]>

FARMINGDALE — Mira Skehan scored five goals and added an assist as the Hall-Dale field hockey team shut out Boothbay 6-0 on Wednesday.

The host Bulldogs improved to 3-4-1; the Seahawks fell to 0-6.

Kiley Rolfe scored Hall-Dale’s other goal, while teammates Torie Tibbetts and Faith McDougal each provided two assists. Brooke Michuad also had an assist.

Hall-Dale keeper Jade Graham made six saves, while Boothbay counterpart Cass Amaral made 12.

GARDINER 9, LINCOLN ACADEMY 0: Brianna Smith and Dewey Clary each had two goals and an assist as the Tigers (8-1) held off the Eagles (0-9-1) at Gardiner.

Emilee Brown scored twice for Gardiner, while teammate Gabi Sousa had one goal and two assists. Taylor Herbert and Avrey McMaster each scored and Brynnlea Chaisson added an assist.

WINTHROP 4, LISBON 1: Madeline Wagner had a hat trick and added an assist as the Ramblers (8-2) edged the Greyhounds (7-2) in Lisbon.

Izzy Folsom had a goal and an assist for Winthrop, while Lauryn Wood added an assist.

Ramblers keeper Madeline Weymouth made 11 saves, while Lisbon’s Maria Levesque made 17.

SPRUCE MOUNTAIN 2, OAK HILL 0: Leah Burgess scored one goal and assisted the other as the Phoenix (8-2) broke a scoreless half-time tie against the Raiders (3-6) in Wales.

Olivia Mastine assisted on Burgess’ goal in the third quarter and Burgess delivered the assist on Avery Bessey’s goal in the fourth quarter.

Sierra Lane stopped 16 of 18 shots on goal for Oak Hill, while Spruce Mountain goaltender Mallory Clark helped keep her net clean without facing a shot on goal.

GIRLS SOCCER

MOUNTAIN VALLEY 8, CARRABEC 0: Four different Falcons (3-4) scored in a resounding win over the Cobras (0-9) at North Anson.

Ali Mazza, Jaden Boulanger and Tessah Leclerc each scored two first-half goals, and Layce Boucher had two second-half goals.

Judge Gendron made three saves for Mountain Valley to secure the shutout.

BRUNSWICK 3, MESSALONSKEE 0: Molly Tefft, Hannah Lay and Alexis Morin scored as the Dragons (6-0-1) went undefeated with a victory over the Eagles (2-4-1) Tuesday in Oakland.

Brunswick goaltender Sophia Morin made two saves, while Messalonskee’s Kiana Carrier made six. The Dragons outshot the Eagles, 9-2.

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Football notebook: Young Oak Hill makes big strides in win over MCI https://har-tzion.com/football-notebook-young-oak-hill-makes-big-strides-in-win-over-mci/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 00:11:24 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/football-notebook-young-oak-hill-makes-big-strides-in-win-over-mci/ MCI’s Braeden Kennedy, right, tries to tackle Oak Hill’s Hunter Drew (22) after Drew intercepted a pass that was knocked down by Oak Hill defensive back Adam Hinckley (11) during of a Saturday football match at the Stacen Doucette Memorial Stadium at Oak Hill High School in Wales . Joe Phelan/Kennebec Journal The last time […]]]>

MCI’s Braeden Kennedy, right, tries to tackle Oak Hill’s Hunter Drew (22) after Drew intercepted a pass that was knocked down by Oak Hill defensive back Adam Hinckley (11) during of a Saturday football match at the Stacen Doucette Memorial Stadium at Oak Hill High School in Wales . Joe Phelan/Kennebec Journal

The last time Oak Hill played at Maine Central Institute, the Raiders and Huskies were playing for a state championship. The first meeting between the two teams since that game seven years ago was very different.

After rocky starts to their respective seasons, Oak Hill and MCI entered Saturdaymeeting with 0-3 records. Rather than squaring off for the Gold Balls, which the Raiders and Huskies did in 2014 and 2015, the two were just desperate to win a game.

“We have recent history against them in a couple of state championships not too long ago,” said Oak Hill head coach Chad Stowell, an assistant for the Raiders in those title clashes. Class D. “That was when both programs were at their peak. They were fun games.

Just like it did in those two state championship fights, Oak Hill once again defeated MCI on Saturday afternoon at Stacen Doucette Memorial Field. The Raiders had a balanced effort on offense and recorded plenty of sacks and turnovers on defense in a 44-0 win.

Hunter Drew and Maverick Swan led the way at Oak Hill, the former rushing for 131 yards and the latter adding 100 on the ground. But the winning effort, Stowell said, was the product of much more than the successes of these two players.

“We had three different 80+ yard guards, three different guys with touchdowns and four different guys with 2-point conversions,” Stowell said. “As a team that doesn’t really have a ton of firepower, being able to have a balanced offense and a diverse offense is something we try to emphasize.”

There have been plenty of growing pains this season for an Oak Hill team that had to replace nearly all of its production from a year ago after graduating from a big senior class. Inexperience hampered the Raiders in Weeks 1 and 2 losses to John Bapst and Poland, respectively, before Lisbon beat them 48-6 in Week 3.

“When you add it all up, I would estimate that we lost about 95 per cent of football contact from last year,” Stowell said. “For these young kids to go from shutout two weeks ago and scoring six last week to what we did on Saturday is something to be proud of.”

THE REVENUE BATTLE often decides football matches. Waterville has now learned that in victory and in defeat.

In Week 3, Waterville came away with a critical road victory over Mt. Desert Island largely because he forced three fumbles and an interception from the Trojans and then capitalized on those errors. Meanwhile, the Panthers didn’t turn it over once in the 26-20 win at Bar Harbor.

Waterville never had a draw in Friday’s 50-32 loss to Spruce Mountain, but it did turn the ball over Phoenix once. The second of those turnovers proved costly as the Phoenix scored two plays after a missed punt to go up two scores, while Waterville failed to capitalize on Spruce Mountain’s lone turnover in the fourth quarter.

“We won that game against MDI because we went there and won the rollover battle,” Waterville head coach Isaac LeBlanc said. “We lost the game (on Friday) because we didn’t win the turnover battle, and they were able to capitalize and take advantage of that.”

Waterville’s next match will be against Morse in a rematch of last year’s Large School North eight-man championship game. The Panthers will initially have a week to focus on self-improvement as they enter the exemption, and LeBlanc knows there is work to be done before his team faces another test. hard.

“You can’t go against these good teams and lose the turnover battle and make the kinds of mistakes that we made,” LeBlanc said. “We also have to force our own turnovers. Otherwise, you’re not going to beat teams like this; it just won’t happen.

GARDINER CRUISE TO a 41-0 win over Brunswick Friday night at Hoch Field. The Tigers – who improved to 3-1 and won their third straight game – beat the Dragons offensively on the ground and in the air.

What may have come as a surprise to Tiger fans, however, is the number of times Gardiner has gone through the air. Quarterback Wyatt Chadwick completed 17 of 34 passes for 244 yards and a touchdown. Of those 34 assists, 26 came in the first half.

“It’s our new offense this year, trying to get the ball in the air,” Chadwick said.

The strategy certainly worked. Chadwick was able to take what the Brunswick defense gave him, hitting screens, flats and roads all evening. Chadwick managed to spread the ball to five different receivers.

“When we watched the movie, we noticed the turns and safeties were played out a bit,” Chadwick said. “Part of the game plan was going to be those fast (roads). With the wind we decided these fastballs were going to be effective.

Gardiner has also had success on the court. Chadwick rushed for 92 yards on nine carries, as well as three rushing touchdowns. Colton Dube added 89 rushing yards on 22 carries, with a touchdown. The Tigers will need the full offense on Friday night in their biggest test yet, against Skowhegan (4-0).

IT’S EASY TO Cony’s kicker Kam Douin was helped by the strong southerly breeze Friday at Cony’s Fuller Field. But how many other kickers, no matter the wind conditions, can kick off for touchdowns like Douin did?

Douin, a converted footballer, had two kickoffs on Friday that landed well behind the end zone in Cony’s 34-10 victory over Windham. And he can kick for placement, too: A line punt made under pressure in the third quarter rolled to the Eagles 13-yard line. He was 4 for 5 on extra points, each kick sailing deep into the night with and against the wind.

Douin joined the team as a weekend warrior, according to Rams coach BL Lippert, playing football during the week and donning the helmet and pads on Fridays. But this season he is traded football for full time football. He played wide receiver and cornerback on Friday and caught a pass for 12 yards.

“When he starts he’s a weapon,” Lippert said. “When he has the wind at his back, he will have touchbacks. Watching the 20 (yard line) is a big difference from starting 30 or 40 like some other teams have to. When he puts his foot in them, he can drive them deep.

Central Maine Newspapers staff writer David Bailey contributed to this report.


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Area roundup: Logan Berube’s hat-trick lifts Leavitt Boys’ football above Oxford Hills https://har-tzion.com/area-roundup-logan-berubes-hat-trick-lifts-leavitt-boys-football-above-oxford-hills/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 00:18:47 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/area-roundup-logan-berubes-hat-trick-lifts-leavitt-boys-football-above-oxford-hills/ PARIS — Logan Berube’s hat trick led Leavitt’s men’s soccer team to a 3-1 win over Oxford Hills on Saturday. Berube scored his first two goals in the first half, one from a penalty and the other from a direct kick. Brayden Greenlaw provided an assist on Berube’s second-half goal. The Hornets improve to 1-5. […]]]>

PARIS — Logan Berube’s hat trick led Leavitt’s men’s soccer team to a 3-1 win over Oxford Hills on Saturday.

Berube scored his first two goals in the first half, one from a penalty and the other from a direct kick. Brayden Greenlaw provided an assist on Berube’s second-half goal. The Hornets improve to 1-5.

Hayden Farrell scored the goal for the Vikings (0-6) in the first half. Paavo Johnson recorded the assist.

LISBON 3, MOUNTAIN VALLEY 0: Three Greyhounds (6-0) scored in a win over the Falcons (1-3-1) at Rumford.

Bryce Poulin, Aidan Parker and Danny Levesque all scored, while Nick Powell and Owen Booker each had an assist.

Lisbon keeper Levi Tibbetts made five saves for the shutout.

FREEPORT 3, GRAY-NEW GLOUCESTER 3: Emmanuel Omeme scored twice for Freeport (2-2-3) and Max Kenney scored a pair for Gray-New Gloucester (3-3-1) as the Falcons and Patriots battled to a draw at Gray .

Owen Rusiecki also scored for Freeport. Aidan Hebert got the other goal for Gray-NG.

HALL-DALE 3, BUCKFIELD 0: Keegan Cary scored a goal and an assist in the Bulldogs’ (4-3) shutout victory over the Bucks (2-4-1) at Farmingdale.

Ricky McGivney and Ihsan Abdalnadi also scored for Hall-Dale, and Breton Lucas provided an assist.

Jackson Leach and Ben Nathan each made four saves while splitting the time in Hall-Dale’s goal. Gavin Charest stopped eight shots for Buckfield.

FIELD HOCKEY
BRUNSWICK 3, LEWISTON 1: Ava Wolverton opened the scoring three minutes into the game and then netted a Felicity Jackson goal as the Dragons (5-3-1) beat the Blue Devils (1-6) at Lewiston.

Brunswick extended their lead to 3-0 in the third quarter thanks to goals from Kiki Dinsmore and Jackson. Lewiston’s Savannah Connor-Schade scored later in the third.

Kimberley McLaughlin made 15 saves for the Blue Devils.

SKOWHEGAN 1, OXFORD HILLS 0: Layla Conway scored the only goal nearly three minutes into the second quarter to give the River Hawks (10-0) a win over the Vikings (5-2-1) in a Class A North matchup at Skowhegan.

Emmah Corson made three saves for the shutout.

Gabby Wright stopped nine shots in the Oxford Hills loss.

EDWARD PETIT 0, CAMDEN HILLS 0: The Red Eddies survived 16 shots and 12 penalty corners from the Windjammers to earn a scoreless draw at Rockport.

Kasey Smith made 13 saves for Edward Little, while Tess Hodgkins stopped 15 shots for Camden Hills.

GIRLS SOCCER
HALL-DALE 5, MT. ABRAM 0: Hayden Madore scored two goals and an assist in the Bulldogs’ 8-0 win over the Roadrunners (4-2) at Farmingdale.

Bethany Ives, Marie Benoit and Sierra Gibbons also scored for Hall-Dale. Audrey Gilbert made six saves to secure the shutout.

Ruthie Gusler stopped 16 shots on goal for Mt. Abram.

MOUNTAIN VALLEY 3, OAK HILL 1: Brooke Chase scored twice for the Falcons (2-4) in a win over the Raiders (1-6) in Wales.

Ciara Abbott also scored in the win, while Jaden Boulanger, Ali Mazza and Emma Clukey each had an assist. Goaltender Justice Gendron stopped seven shots.

Eliana Smith scored Oak Hill’s only goal in the first half and MacKenzie Vattaso made 14 saves.

MT. BLUE 4, HAMPDEN 1: KK Daggett scored twice in the first half as the Cougars (7-0) beat the Broncos (2-4-1) at Hampden.

Meren Zeliger, who assisted on both of Daggett’s goals, scored after halftime for Mt. Blue, while Abbey Goodspeed opened the scoring in the second half with a goal from 45 yards out. Cougars goaltender Caitlin Burke stopped six shots.

Hampden’s Destiny Morse kicked the ball 40 yards into the goal in the second half. Gracie Baker and Logan Daigle combined to stop 15 shots on the Broncos goal.

OXFORD HILLS 5, LEAVITT 1: The Vikings scored four second-half goals to pull away from the Hornets at Turner.

Kylee Spugnardi leveled the game for Leavitt early after half-time and then Lizzy Hallee put Oxford Hills back on top to start the Vikings frenzy. Hallee and Ashley Richardson each had two goals and Meredith Harthorne also scored for Oxford Hills.

Maddy Herrick made eight saves for the Vikings, while Kira Welch stopped four shots for the Hornets and Jamie Ellis added one save during his time in goal.


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Obituary: Robert B. Byerly (Bob) (09/23/22) https://har-tzion.com/obituary-robert-b-byerly-bob-09-23-22/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 19:20:34 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/obituary-robert-b-byerly-bob-09-23-22/ Robert B. Byerly (Bob), 78, of Mtn Home, died September 13, 2022 at his home following a long battle with pulmonary fibrosis. He leaves 3 sons, Robert (Mtn. Home, ID), Edward (Clackamas, OR), James (King Hill, ID) and their mother, Diane (Dee) Hale, three grandchildren; 2 sisters, Mary Mattox (Woodridge, IL), Alice Kauzlarich (Chuckey, TN), […]]]>

Robert B. Byerly (Bob), 78, of Mtn Home, died September 13, 2022 at his home following a long battle with pulmonary fibrosis.

He leaves 3 sons, Robert (Mtn. Home, ID), Edward (Clackamas, OR), James (King Hill, ID) and their mother, Diane (Dee) Hale, three grandchildren; 2 sisters, Mary Mattox (Woodridge, IL), Alice Kauzlarich (Chuckey, TN), and many close friends.

Her brother, Richard Byerly (Caldwell, ID) went to rest on December 9, 2021.

Born in Bloomington, Illinois, the son of Richard and Bernadine (Dietz) Byerly, he has been a resident of Mountain Home since 1978.

Bob was in the Air Force from 1965 to 1969 and toured Thailand during the Vietnam conflict. After an honorable discharge, he worked in electronics companies in Silicon Valley, California, and took evening classes at Foothill College.

He then spent several years as a television and radio technician and became a computer systems administrator at Bell Laboratories in Naperville, Illinois. After four years, the family decided to move to Idaho.

In Idaho, Bob worked as a TV technician and as a temp in the Mountain Home Air Force base carpentry shop. And then, in 1989, he changed careers to driving a road tractor-trailer. He retired in August 2013.

A funeral service will be held at 11:00 a.m., Sunday, October 2, 2022 at Hammett Community Church with private interment at Idaho State Veterans Cemetery, Boise, Idaho.

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Rockin the Region with Lance Carpenter https://har-tzion.com/rockin-the-region-with-lance-carpenter/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 03:38:41 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/rockin-the-region-with-lance-carpenter/ Carpenter is one of many up-and-coming artists performing at the Rivershed Songwriters Festival on October 1. The Rivershed Songwriters Festival comes to Killington for the very first time. The festival is hosted by owner Kara Tondorf and will take place on October 1 from 7-10 p.m. at the Rivershed located at 747 Killington Road. The […]]]>

Carpenter is one of many up-and-coming artists performing at the Rivershed Songwriters Festival on October 1.

The Rivershed Songwriters Festival comes to Killington for the very first time. The festival is hosted by owner Kara Tondorf and will take place on October 1 from 7-10 p.m. at the Rivershed located at 747 Killington Road.

The festival features artists from Nashville and Los Angeles as well as artists based in New England. It’s the best lineup yet and an event you definitely don’t want to miss. Tickets are only $40 and are available at: therivershed.com.

Nashville’s hitmakers are Johnny Bulford, Heidi Raye, Tim Fagan, Chris Gelbuda, Lance Carpenter and Jason Ashley. They’re the talented songwriters behind hits by Kenny Chesney, Jason Aldean, Randy Travis, Sam Hunt, Meghan Trainor, Colbie Caillat, Faith Hill, Jason Mraz and many more. The evening also includes rising stars of the New England music industry like Rob Pagnano, Kristen Merlin, MB Padfield and Houston Bernard. Three or four musicians will occupy the stage at a time.

Lance Carpenter

I had the pleasure of speaking with Lance Carpenter who is originally from Arkansas but has lived in Nashville for 11 years. He looks forward to festival shows like this where he can catch up with old musician friends and socialize a bit. I asked him to describe his show and he said, “Some of the best words I can say aren’t even mine. I ended up with a show and a guy came over and said ‘Do you know who you are?’ I said, ‘Yes sir, I do’ He said, ‘No, let me tell you who you are. If Toby Keith and Blake Shelton had a baby, you would be their boy.

Lance Carpenter, 41, didn’t start playing guitar until college, but back then it was just for therapy and something to do. He said, “I never had any aspiration to perform or even write songs. I love country music and listen to it, but it wasn’t something I thought would become a career.

Between 1999 and 2007 he wrote 30 to 40 songs.

He went to Arkansas Tech University where he played football and came away with a degree in administration and emergency management. Out of college, he worked for the Arkansas State Department of Emergency Management for three and a half years. When Hurricane Katrina hit, he joined FEMA and began traveling the country responding to disasters, preparing and recovering. Carpenter said, “Everywhere I went I took a guitar. After a long day, I took the guitar and it was my therapy. It made me forget everything we had done.

Carpenter discovered the Nashville Songwriters Association (NSA) through Google. After joining him, they invited him for a weekend. He said: “When I realized people were doing this for a living, that’s when the hobby turned into a passion. I thought that was cool and maybe I should sue.”

He taught himself guitar watching CMT in his hotel room.

Carpenter grew up in George Sound. It’s what his mother played in the car on the way to school, he said. He really enjoys listening to country music storytellers like Alabama and Garth Brooks. In college, he turned to rock music, be it the 80s, Metallica or Nirvana. In high school, he was introduced to hip-hop. He said: “I fell in love with Eminem and how he could create a song. I also listened to Christian music like Mark Schultz. I had all of these musical influences even though I wasn’t performing…really my influences on how I write and perform came from songwriters like Kent Blazy and Steve Seskin.

His first performance in front of others dates back to 2007 in Portland, Maine. A buddy asked him to play his break because, as he said, “we don’t have country music here.”

Carpenter said, “On my first song, I was so nervous, I was shaking like a leaf in a windstorm. I dropped my mic three times during the first song. It was so embarrassing. It was an awful performance. But in 2011, when he moved to Nashville, his first show went really well. It was a small songwriters project at the Listening Room Cafe that he recorded for an album. It was the first time he formed a band. They sold it with about 350 people.

Carpenter said he was lucky to have been able to write songs for others to perform. He wrote and recorded a song with Richie McDonald of Lonestar, which they released together. He owes his songwriting talents to the NSA. They taught him some real beginner-type tricks, he said. Over the years, he took more advanced courses.

What’s really cool is that he started his own company called Music Row Coach. It helps emerging songwriters and artists. He said, “I’ve done pretty much everything you can do in the music business, like having publishing deals, record deals, or tours. If something I’ve done can help someone else do it, then I want to do it.

Carpenter is still constantly writing songs. He wrote about 1,500 in total, he estimates. Her phone is filled with voice memos of song ideas. Her favorite to write is story songs.

“A good old beginning, middle and end,” he explained. “Here’s how it happened and here are the details. I wrote historical songs, love songs, I hate this town, I love this town. If you want to be a good songwriter, you can’t let the truth get in the way of a good song. You have to invent things where it’s a little more commercial. I write in a very conversational way for the most part.

He writes country, pop and contemporary Christian music and says it’s all so different with the structure of the song and how you bring it to life.

Carpenter knows what music meant to him growing up. He said, “If I hear a certain song on the radio, it brings me back to that place. I can taste this food, I can smell the rain in this air. If you think back to happy memories, they are surrounded by music; sad memories are surrounded by music.

He also loves and performs for his fans, “Knowing that every time I go on stage, a song I’ve written has touched someone in the audience and may be the therapy they needed to hear or to see how a song can penetrate someone to the point it gives them an emotional response, that’s really cool,” he added.

He released a full album, a few EPs and a digital. His latest single is “I Bought a Bar”, which he wrote with Kendall Marvel and Big Al Anderson. He just shot a music video in Key West for “Sand Bar,” which will be released next spring. He also hopes to release a new album in 2023.

For more information visit his website: LanceCarpenterMusic.com. He is on all streaming platforms and social networks Facebook, Instagram and Tik Tok. (He said there were a lot of scammers so make sure it’s Lance Carpenter with a blue tick.)

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GOLDEN SHIELD BEGINS PHASE III DRILLING AT MARUDI MOUNTAIN TO EXTEND MINERALIZATION AT MAZOA HILL AND TEST NEW EXPLORATION TARGETS https://har-tzion.com/golden-shield-begins-phase-iii-drilling-at-marudi-mountain-to-extend-mineralization-at-mazoa-hill-and-test-new-exploration-targets/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/golden-shield-begins-phase-iii-drilling-at-marudi-mountain-to-extend-mineralization-at-mazoa-hill-and-test-new-exploration-targets/ Lateral and depth expansion of high-grade gold mineralization at the Mazoa Hill deposit: Drill holes will exit on existing high grade intersections. Test new exploration prospects by drilling: New targets will be drill tested to assess the expansion potential of the Marudi Mountain property. Continue exploring: An induced polarization (IP) survey will be conducted on […]]]>
  • Lateral and depth expansion of high-grade gold mineralization at the Mazoa Hill deposit: Drill holes will exit on existing high grade intersections.

  • Test new exploration prospects by drilling: New targets will be drill tested to assess the expansion potential of the Marudi Mountain property.

  • Continue exploring: An induced polarization (IP) survey will be conducted on the Marudi Mountain property, which includes a minimum of 20 line km, on the Mazoa, Throne and July prospects. Trenching and field mapping will continue throughout the drilling program.

VANCOUVER, BC, September 20, 2022 /CNW/ – Golden Shield Resources Inc. (CSE: GSRI) (FRA: 4LE0) (there “Company” Where “golden shield“) is pleased to announce the start of Phase III drilling on the Marudi Mountain property located in the southwest Guyana (there “Marudi Mountain PropertyDrill crews have been mobilized to the site and drilling is underway. Phase III drilling will target extending the mineralization at the Mazoa Hill deposit and drilling new exploration targets.

CEO, Hilbert Shields said: “Continued exploration of the Marudi Mountain property is currently our priority. golden shield The Phase I and Phase II exploration programs confirmed and extended the high-grade gold mineralization of the Mazoa Hill deposit. Since June, the field teams have been working hard to uncover new targets, and we are excited about the results, especially at Throne and July..”

Overview of the Marudi Mountain property with a 100m depth slice map of Magnetization Vector Inversion (MVI) in the background. Phase III drill targets are highlighted. (CNW Group/Golden Shield Resources)

Phase III drilling

The primary objective of the 3000 meters, Phase III, drill program on the Marudi Mountain property aims to extend high-grade gold mineralization at depth and laterally at the Mazoa Hill deposit and test at least two undrilled targets; Throne and July. These new targets were identified by golden shield geologists and have been shown to have the same mineralized host lithology, Quartzite-Metachert (“QMC”), as the Mazoa Hill deposit. Prioritization of clean field drill targets will be based on coincident anomalies in trenching, geophysical and field exploration data.

Exploration

Field exploration, including trenching, mapping, sampling and field crossings, will continue while drilling is underway on the Marudi Mountain property. The Company will also perform an induced polarization (IP) study. The IP survey aims to map gold sulphide mineralization on the Marudi Mountain property and will take place between the Mazoa Hill deposit and the July and Throne prospects. This zone was established as a 1.9 km mineralized corridor (see press release from the September 12, 2022). The IP survey will be oriented in a NE-SW direction, perpendicular to the apparent trend of the mineralized host rock. A total of 20 km of line must be completed on the property. The IP survey will establish the deep geophysical signature at Mazoa Hill and, based on this, identify similar target areas.

Qualified person

Leo HathawayP. Geo, Executive Chairman of golden shieldand a Qualified Person as defined by National Instrument 43-101 Standards of Disclosure for Mineral Projects, has reviewed, verified and approved the scientific and technical information contained in this press release and verified the data underlying this scientific information and techniques.

About golden shield

Golden Shield Resources was founded by experienced professionals who are convinced that there are still many more gold mines to be discovered in Guyana. The company is well financed and has three fully controlled gold projects: Marudi Mountain, Arakaka and Fish Creek. golden shield continues to evaluate other gold opportunities in Guyana.

This press release includes certain “ForwardLooking Statements” within the meaning of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and “forwardResearch Information” under applicable Canadian securities laws. When used in this press release, the words “anticipate”, “believe”, “estimate”, “expect”, “target” , “plan”, “anticipate”, “may”, “would”, “could”, “schedule” and similar words or phrases, identify forwardlooking for statements or information. These beforeforward-looking statements or information relate, among other things, to: the exploration and development of the Company’s mining projects; and publication of drilling results.

Forwardforward-looking and forward-looking statementsseek information relating to any future mining production, liquidity, increased value and financial market profile of golden shieldfuture growth potential for golden shield and its activities, and future exploration plans are based on management’s reasonable assumptions, estimates, expectations, analyzes and opinions, which are based on management’s experience and perception of trends, current conditions and anticipated developments, and other factors that management believes are relevant and reasonable in the circumstances, but which may prove to be incorrect. Assumptions have been made regarding, among other things, the price of gold and other metals; no escalation in the severity of the COVID-19 pandemic; exploration and development costs; estimated development costs of exploration projects; golden shield its ability to operate safely and efficiently and its ability to obtain financing on reasonable terms.

These statements reflect golden shield respective current views regarding future events and are necessarily based on a number of other assumptions and estimates which, while considered reasonable by management, are inherently subject to significant business, economic, competitive, political and social. Many factors, known and unknown, could cause actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from the results, performance or achievements which are or may be expressed or implied by such information.forward-looking statements or forward-looking information and golden shield has made assumptions and estimates based on or related to many of these factors. These factors include, but are not limited to: the Company’s dependence on a mining project; the volatility of precious metal prices; risks associated with the conduct of the Company’s mineral exploration activities in Guyana; regulatory, consent or authorization delays; risks related to dependence on the Company’s management team and external contractors; risks related to mineral resources and reserves; the Company’s inability to obtain insurance covering all risks, whether on a commercially reasonable basis or at all; currency fluctuations; risks related to the inability to generate sufficient operating cash flow; risks related to project financing and share issues; the risks and unknowns inherent in all mining projects, including the inaccuracy of reserves and resources, metallurgical recoveries and the capital and operating costs of such projects; disputes over title deeds, in particular unbuilt title deeds; environmental, health and safety laws and regulations; the ability of the communities in which the Company operates to manage and cope with the implications of COVID-19; the economic and financial implications of COVID-19 for the Company; operational or technical difficulties related to mining or development activities; employee relations, social unrest or unavailability; the Company’s interactions with surrounding communities and artisanal miners; the Company’s ability to successfully integrate the acquired assets; the speculative nature of exploration and development, including the risks of declining quantities or grades of reserves; stock market volatility; conflicts of interest between certain directors and officers; lack of liquidity for the shareholders of the Company; litigation risk; and the factors identified in the Company’s public disclosure documents available at www.sedar.com. Readers are cautioned against attributing undue certainty to the transmissionforward-looking statements or forward-looking information. Although the Company has attempted to identify important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially, other factors may cause results not to be anticipated, estimated or predicted. The Company does not intend, and assumes no obligation, to update these forecasts.forward-looking statements or information to reflect changes in assumptions or changes in circumstances or any other event affecting such statements or information, except as required by applicable law.

Golden Shield Resources Inc. Logo (CNW Group/Golden Shield Resources)

Golden Shield Resources Inc. Logo (CNW Group/Golden Shield Resources)

SOURCE Golden Shield Resources

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The debate over the development of the village of Crooked Creek continues https://har-tzion.com/the-debate-over-the-development-of-the-village-of-crooked-creek-continues/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 16:40:00 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/the-debate-over-the-development-of-the-village-of-crooked-creek-continues/ As the development enters its final stages, the city council will review the plan at its September 20 meeting. City of Winter Park/Courtesy Image Grand County residents remain divided over the controversial Cooper Creek Village development in Winter Park, as evidenced by public comments at a Sept. 6 meeting regarding the development. During the meeting, […]]]>
As the development enters its final stages, the city council will review the plan at its September 20 meeting.
City of Winter Park/Courtesy Image

Grand County residents remain divided over the controversial Cooper Creek Village development in Winter Park, as evidenced by public comments at a Sept. 6 meeting regarding the development.

During the meeting, residents of Grand County came forward to discuss the development. Some expressed their support for the project, including a land reserved for the gondola and a hotel with all amenities. Others expressed concerns, such as increased traffic on Timber Drive and the fact that workforce housing is located far from town. Developer Charlie Johnson of JAC Colorado II, LLC also spoke. He described improvements his company made to its final development plan after evaluating previous public feedback, such as preserving open spaces for the benefit of wildlife and recreation. Johnson also addressed new concerns expressed by community members at the Sept. 6 meeting.

Diving into the history of development

Public hearings on the development plan have been ongoing since October 2021, each time sparking debate. The most recent hearings were on August 16 and September 6. On August 16, the developers presented their FDP to the city. According to the FDP, Cooper Creek Village will consist of two areas. The first 53-acre area is bordered on the south by US Forest Service land, on the north by Idlewild Meadow, on the east by Beaver Village Condominiums, and on the west by Hideaway Village South. The second area of ​​6 acres includes 10 plots in town. Nine are north of City Hall and include the Cooper Creek Mall and associated parking lots; the other is located south of Vasquez Road, next to Winter Park Station. In total, the development would be nearly 60 acres, both in unincorporated Grand County (which will be annexed to the city) and within the city limits of Winter Park.



Opinions of residents divided

At the September 6 meeting, several members of the community were grateful for the improvements the developers had made to the blueprint. A major concern has been alleviated: Idlewild Meadow, the open wetlands of the Idlewild Subdivision that were previously marked for development, will now remain undisturbed.

“I want to acknowledge that Charlie (Johnson) has worked with us and we very much appreciate the decision to leave Idlewild Meadow as a passive open space. Yeah, wildlife! I was thrilled,” said Cathy Ratschkowsky, a resident of the Idlewild Subdivision.



Another major concern has been the lack of water to support the new development. Bob Wolf, former city councilman and former chairman of the Winter Park Water and Sanitation District, explained that the city has entered into many agreements with Denver Water over the years to increase Winter Park’s water supply. Park, with now 6037 taps available for development.

“It may seem like we’re building at an accelerated pace…and maybe our water is running out, but that’s just not the case,” Wolf said.

Grand County resident and business owner Mark Johnson spoke about the benefits of providing more amenities and accommodations in the city, as Winter Park Resort is now on the map as one of the most popular resorts in the country. .

“This project is good for us,” said Mark Johnson. “We are no longer a sleepy little resort town. In fact, we’re on the verge of international stardom…we have some of the best ski areas in all of North America.

Winter Park resident Chris Siewack expressed cautious optimism about the project, first congratulating council members and the developer, but warning that Cooper Creek Village must keep the intimate small-town appeal intact. of Winter Park.

“I’m worried about the soul of this town,” he said. “I moved here because it’s a place where you can show up on the mountain with tape on your clothes and no one is judging you. People look out for each other here, young people move here, and it’s a family type story. I don’t want to see this place turn into Vail. That being said… I’m trying to focus on the positive and get excited about this project moving forward.”

Siewack added that one aspect that would get residents involved in the project is to ensure that all housing created for the workforce is in Winter Park. Under the current agreement between the city and the developers, some workforce housing could eventually be located up to Red Dirt Hill.

The city council and Johnson have talked about this point. Both parties have admitted that not all housing may be restricted to the downtown limits, but there are 45 secure restricted access bedrooms for a location in Cooper Creek Square. As the city grew, Johnson and the city debated whether they wanted to be “locked in a corner” by designating all workforce housing in the downtown area, but decided said it was ideal for the accommodation to be as close to Winter Park as possible.

“I agree that we need to keep the workforce in the town of Winter Park, and that creates the soul…. and the culture of a community. That’s what we want to do with workforce housing,” Johnson said. “Our project has the highest labor housing requirements of any project ever proposed in the City of Winter Park.”

A petition for community members to work where they live

After the meeting, community members Chris Siewack and Bob Wright decided to take it a step further beyond public comment. The pair took to the streets with a petition expressing the need to keep affordable housing within development boundaries. Wright submitted the petition, along with a letter to the city council, after obtaining signatures from community members. Wright told Sky-Hi News the signatures were obtained by nearly 100 residents of Winter Park businesses on September 12 and 13.

“With more time, I believe this list could go on to hundreds or more. I received no opposition from the community when I presented this petition to them,” said the letter Wright shared with Sky-Hi. News, “Some people said they weren’t into politics, but no one was opposed to keeping labor housing in the Cooper Creek development. Everyone was opposed to the idea that the workforce housing is as remote as Red Dirt Hill.

Wright explained that he and Siewack visited the following businesses: Epic Mountain Sports, Philly Phatz, Best Western, Randi’s Grill & Pub, The Noble Buck, Fontenot’s, Conoco, Wake N’ Bacon, Fireside Market, Liquor Depot, The Perk, The Trailhead, Smokehouse BBQ, Liquor Store, Strip & Tail, Winter Park Pub, The Ditch on 40, Hideaway Brewery, Subway, Christy Sports, Divide Board Shop and Active Images. They also received signatures from several Fraser and Tabernash business owners.

“Many signatories were visibly upset when presented with the idea that labor housing for Cooper Creek Development might not stay within the boundaries of the development,” the petition letter continues. “People are happiest when they live where they work. There are so many problems with trying to build a workforce community outside of Winter Park’s jurisdiction. Police, fire, transportation, mental health and the list goes on.

Only time will tell where affordable housing can be built, as the city continues to evaluate the project and the future face of Winter Park.

Next steps

As one of Winter Park’s largest developments to date, the City Council has spent many hours with the developers to craft a deal that ideally benefits not only tourism, but also the locals who make the community a special place where tourists want to flock. . As Siewack said at the Sept. 6 meeting, “It’s the soul of the city — the people who live here all the time, spending money during mud season. People who live here all the time care. Let’s keep them here.

Now that the public hearing is closed, the city will continue to meet with the promoters to finalize the agreements. Their next meeting will take place on Tuesday, September 20. To learn more about previous meetings on Cooper Creek Village or how to attend the September 20 meeting virtually or in person, please visit: wpgov.com/our-government/calendars-minutes.

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Otis Mountain Get Down returns | New https://har-tzion.com/otis-mountain-get-down-returns-new/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/otis-mountain-get-down-returns-new/ ELIZABETHTOWN – Nestled in the Pleasant Valley Adirondack foothills between Elizabethtown and New Russia is Otis Mountain; site of the annual music festival known as the Get Down. According to its website, the Get Down is called “A weekend of music, experience and community. Come for the music, stay for everything else. We keep it […]]]>

ELIZABETHTOWN – Nestled in the Pleasant Valley Adirondack foothills between Elizabethtown and New Russia is Otis Mountain; site of the annual music festival known as the Get Down.

According to its website, the Get Down is called “A weekend of music, experience and community. Come for the music, stay for everything else. We keep it intimate, open and affordable so everyone can connect with new artists or old friends.

“DON’T POOP IN THE WOODS”

It can be interpreted as a mini-Woodstock with virtually the same values ​​of peace and love. The 2019 event attracted around 3,000 attendees while this year attendance was limited to 2,000, which includes vendors and festival staff.

Although mostly college-age attendees, there were a handful who remembered 1969 at Max Yasgur’s farm. To carry on the sentiment, some attendees dressed as incarnate hippies with tied shirts and flowing dresses, as they walked through the woods, fields and hills and danced barefoot.

The festival was a well-organized event with signs indicating camping areas, outbuildings, directions to stages, property lines, and other features. There are also tick warnings as well as signs that read: “Check trees before hanging hammocks” and “Don’t poop in the woods.”

AS IF THE HIATUS NEVER HAPPENED

Referring to the hiatus and restart as he put up information boards, Otis organizer Zach Allott said: “It’s great. It’s almost like (the break) never happened.

Bins with an emphasis on recycling are emptied regularly, which has contributed to the fact that, given the number of attendees and the amount of food and drink consumed, the sprawling area that stretches across the grounds of the venue , on the ski slope and in the woods, has virtually no litter.

Medical staff, a first aid post and ambulance as well as discreet security are present throughout the festival, but over the years they have rarely been needed.

THE INTERPRETERS

According to Otis’ website: “Our lineup is curated in diversity and spirit, rather than popularity.”

Thus, the nicknames of the performers were as eclectic as the genre. Of course, to create a group, you must create a name that has not been used. Consequently, Mr. Twin Sister, Vetliver, Dead Gowns, Blood Cultures (whose band members are listed as “Anonymous”), and Thus Love were among the approximately 40 artists.

Audiences were treated to a sonic spectrum that, according to the artists’ biographies, included “dense house pop, soulful folk rock, bossa nova, psychedelic rock, Appalachian music, experimental indie pop , nervous lo-fi rhythms and crisp synths. »

OTIS HISTORY

The festival is hosted on the ancestral lands of the Kanienkehaka Nation and the Odanak of the Abenaki people. Thus the organizers with regard to the original inhabitants ask the showmen to “do good things”.

The site is located on a former ski resort nestled in what settlers once called the “Pleasant Valley” more than two centuries ago.

For many years, locals called the assortment of dilapidated buildings in the current parking lot, “The Farm”. It was once owned by the Lobdell family; hence the name of the road. The farm was a favorite spot for revelers and was occasionally patrolled by sheriff’s deputies who, during their own teenage years, may have used the secluded surroundings for their own revelry.

From the 1950s through the 1970s, Otis Mountain was a ski hill for many locals who could not travel to or afford resorts such as Whiteface, Killington and Stowe and sought the company of friends and extended families who gathered for an inexpensive day on the slopes.

During years of inactivity, the site, like others in the region, became a dumping ground for garbage. Get Down promoter Zach Allott’s parents, Jeff and Sue, along with Steve Winkler and Ed Marvin took over the property and cleared it of trash and overgrown vegetation.

Music-inclined, Jeff instituted a bluegrass festival at the site in 2003 which continued until 2009. Then in 2013 the festival was resurrected by Zach on a considerably larger scale with three stages and more acts.

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W.Va. vs. Va. : Allow to revise a fight in the yard https://har-tzion.com/w-va-vs-va-allow-to-revise-a-fight-in-the-yard/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 10:22:00 +0000 https://har-tzion.com/w-va-vs-va-allow-to-revise-a-fight-in-the-yard/ Sen. Joe Manchin (DW.Va.) wants a disputed gas pipeline in his state to be part of his permit reform effort. But Virginia lawmakers who might generally support a permit overhaul are balking at the deal, in part because of the pipeline that would connect the two states. The problem is the route of the 303-mile […]]]>

Sen. Joe Manchin (DW.Va.) wants a disputed gas pipeline in his state to be part of his permit reform effort. But Virginia lawmakers who might generally support a permit overhaul are balking at the deal, in part because of the pipeline that would connect the two states.

The problem is the route of the 303-mile pipeline from Mountain Valley. Virginia’s two Democratic senators were cautious in authorizing the reform, with one saying Thursday that congressional action could unfairly enter into the complicated political battle over the pipeline in his state.

“For years, I’ve argued with both pipeline opponents and supporters that Congress shouldn’t make pipeline decisions,” Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) told reporters. “We should have a licensing process in place that works and then run any project through them.”

Kaine added that when a deal is finally released, “I wouldn’t like to see something forcing Congress to do that.”

The West Virginia-Virginia split is a crucial part of the licensing debate rocking Capitol Hill. Democratic leaders in the Senate are seeking to build support for authorizing the reform as they seek to ram the measure through with an interim government funding bill. But Democrats across the political spectrum are balking at the deal.

According to legislative frameworks and Manchin statements, the yet-to-be-released permitting measure, which would streamline environmental reviews of energy projects, would also direct federal agencies to prioritize finalizing permit approvals for the Mountain Valley Pipeline. The deal would bring changes to the arena where pipeline legal challenges would be filed.

Progress hampered

As proposed, the project would move natural gas from West Virginia to a compressor endpoint in Pittsylvania County, Va., after crossing six other county lines.

The developer behind the project claims that the project is nearly 95% complete. Opponents, however, say the figure fails to take into account the complexity of the remaining work and intense land restoration efforts pending.

Although it won approval in 2017 from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the pipeline has been mired in setbacks and slowdowns as legal challenges to permits and environmental reviews have hampered progress.

Many of these court rulings have come from the 4th United States Circuit Court of Appeals, located in Richmond, Virginia. for this court (thread of energySeptember 15).

A shift away from the venue is among the issues Virginia lawmakers are concerned about.

“I don’t know exactly what the end result of this will be, but I would have deep concern about removing jurisdiction from the 4th Circuit this way or any other way,” Kaine added.

Kaine said he was due for a briefing on Thursday afternoon to get a better sense of what is contained in the actual language of the proposed licensing reform bill. He also said he had discussed his concerns with Schumer and wanted to speak with Manchin in the future.

While Kaine balked at the pipeline, Republican Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin backed him up. According to a July 29 letter he sent to FERC, the governor argued that increasing the availability of natural gas would go a long way to helping the state bolster its electricity supply and serve as a transitional fuel. .

“I don’t think it’s in the interest of Virginians to condemn this project in the spirit of reducing carbon emissions when this project is in fact essential to continuing to meet emissions reduction targets in the Commonwealth,” Youngkin wrote.

Manchin also touted the project’s ability to help move more American energy to global markets, where market shocks from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine have had European allies scrambling to access energy. energy.

Not just Kaine

However, concerns about the bill aren’t just about Kaine. They also come from other Virginia lawmakers who support an overhaul of permits.

Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) — long seen as a proponent of permit reform and a central cog in the moderate-led bipartisan infrastructure law last year — held up approval of the deal permit until he better understands what is in the text.

“Do I support license reform? Yes, because it’s the idea of ​​starting the permitting process simultaneously rather than sequentially, especially when we’re going to have to build things like offshore wind plants,” Warner told E&E News. “On [Mountain Valley pipeline]I want to see the details, because it’s already halfway through.

Meanwhile, Rep. Abigail Spanberger (D-Va.), a vulnerable moderate whose district spans southern Virginia, also expressed reservations about the legislation authorizing, though she did not specifically cited Mountain Valley.

Spanberger joined a group of 78 other House Democrats urging House leaders to drop the rolling license reform deal on the government’s next draft funding resolution set to be considered in the coming weeks.

“For me to push it into must-have legislation, I don’t think is appropriate because we’re not doing the due diligence to actually discuss reforms,” ​​Spanberger said, adding that she didn’t want to risk a government shutdown for a “tangential”. process change.

GOP reproaches

Representative Morgan Griffith (R-Va.).
| Francis Chung/E&E News

A key Republican where the pipeline crosses is also against the Mountain Valley effort.

Rep. Morgan Griffith (R-Va.) said he wouldn’t support the legislation if it focused on accelerating pipeline construction, including changing the courts.

“If they reduced it to Mountain Valley, I would think some of my colleagues would realize that I’m against it, and maybe they would be too,” he said.

Griffith, a senior member of the Energy and Commerce Oversight and Investigative Subcommittee, is also closely tied to fossil companies. Although he supports authorizing the reform, he said there is near-universal opposition to the pipeline among voters in his district, where the pipeline would be routed.

“Virginia Tech liberals are against it, and conservative farmers are against it,” he said.

Griffith said the opposition is the result of poor communication and coordination by pipeline builders with local communities and officials.

For example, he said he has heard complaints from farmers about their land being surveyed without the builders telling them first. In another case, he said the route was proposed near a daycare centre.

Kaine described similar complaints.

“Some of the legal issues they’ve had are due to poor performance,” Kaine said. “I’ve never done a poll or seen a poll on this, but it’s a project that’s been somewhat mixed. And while some would suggest, “Oh, it’s because the courts are bad now,” it was crossed over due to some operational challenges.

Journalist Marc Heller contributed to it.

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